2019, ALL POSTS, Baby, birth plan, Charlene Yared West, HypnoBirthing, Magazine: Life Healthcare, pregnancy, pregnant, Relax Into Birth Hypnobirthing

Do you have the pregnancy glow?

In pregnancy, your skin can exude a truly healthy glow because of a combination of factors, such as greater blood volume, which can give the cheeks a flushed look and more sebum on the skin, which can make the skin shine. While every woman experiences hormone changes in pregnancy, not every woman will get that pregnancy glow. It is well-documented that pregnancy brings with it a whole new set of skin concerns – not just the most common of problems, namely stretchmarks. Charlene Yared West spoke to Life Fourways Hospital Gynaecologist, Dr Abigail Lukhaimane, Life Mercantile Hospital Dermatologist, Dr Zinzi Limba and Genesis Maternity Clinic Maternity Coach & Spa owner, Tsholo Bless, to find out more about skin conditions in pregnancy.

Acne-oh-no!

What is it? “Acne is very common in pregnancy, especially in the first and second trimesters and in some cases can be quite severe. When your hormones settle by the third trimester it can subside for most women, but this is not always the case” says Dr Abigail Lukhaimane. “I do my best to reassure moms that it is a natural , cosmetic condition and that it will get better when hormones stabilise.” 

Primary cause: Dr Zinzi Limba explains that increased levels of androgen hormones, believed to be important for cervical ripening at full term, as well as for maintaining a healthy pregnancy, can cause acne. 

What can you do? “Managing acne in pregnancy can be tricky because many prescriptions and over the counter treatments are contraindicated for pregnancy and can cause birth defects,” says Dr Limba.  She encourages moms to talk to their doctor to plot the best and safest way forward before taking any acne treatment. 

Tsholo Bless recommends some easy drug-free options for managing zit outbreaks:

  • When washing your face, use an oil-free, alcohol-free cleanser, limiting washes to twice a day. Avoid over-cleansing as this stimulates the oil glands in the skin to produce more oil.
  • Change your pillowcases often – use cotton pillow cases which encourage the skin to breathe.
  • Keep your hands away from your face so that you do not spread bacteria from your fingers to your face. This goes for your mobile phone too – a device dripping in bacteria, even on the best days!
  • Avoid the temptation to squeeze or pop your pimples, as this can cause re-infection and scarring.
  • If you have clogged pores, treat yourself to a professional salon facial.

Chloasma: The Mask of pregnancy

Dr Lukhaimane explains that chloasma, also known as melasma, is a common skin problem where the condition causes dark, discoloured patches on your skin (hyperpigmentation).  Most common on the forehead, nose, cheeks and chin.  According to the American Academy of Dermatology, 90% of people who develop this condition are women.
Primary cause: “Estrogen and progesterone sensitivity often accompany this condition and can trigger it,” says Dr Lukhaimane. “Usually it is self-limiting and will fade after the pregnancy. Sun exposure can also predispose melasma. In addition, darker skinned people are more at risk than those with fair skin.” 

How do I know I have it? A visual exam of the area is often enough for your care provider to diagnose it, says Dr Limba. “However, dermatologists can perform a bed-side test using a Wood’s Lamp – a special kind of light that allows the doctor to check for any bacterial and fungal infections to determine how many layers of skin the melasma has affected.”

Living with melasma: Not all cases clear up with treatment, but there are methods of behavioural changes that can help minimise the worsening of the condition.  “Visit your doctor to discuss prescription options that are safe to use for pregnancy,” says Tsholo.

  • Use Paraben-free makeup if you are self-conscious to cover up areas of discolouration.
  • Wear Sunscreen containing Titanium Dioxide & Zinc Oxide – every day!
  • Wear a wide-brimmed hat and protective clothing when you are out and about in the sunshine.
  • Seek out support groups for your condition.

The Pregnancy Line

The pregnancy line is also known as linea nigra and is a normal and natural part of pregnancy. It is brown and darker than the skin tone of the woman and is a vertical line running down the middle of the belly, between the belly button and the pubis, explains Dr Lukhaimane. 

Primary cause: “It is understood that the linea nigra and the darkening around the nipples is caused by the hormones estrogen and progesterone, which stimulate the production of melanin, the pigment which darkens and tans the skin in pregnancy,” says Dr Limba. 

Does it fade? After pregnancy and birth  it goes away on it’s own – you do not need treatment. 

Stretchmarks? You earned your stripes mama! 

“Stretchmarks are very common in pregnancy, affecting about 8 out of 10 women –  and do not cause harm to the mother or baby, but can cause itching on the area for some women,” says Dr Lukhaimane. 

Primary cause: Dr Limba explains that skin is highly adaptable and can stretch and contract, but during pregnancy, the skin does not have enough time to adjust, which causes the skin to tear, which in turns results in a scar that forms – and this is known as a stretchmark. 

Who gets stretchmarks? “Lighter skinned women often get pink stretchmarks forming, while darker skinned women will have lighter stretchmarks than the surrounding skin area.  Stretchmarks can occur anywhere; on the hips, thighs, belly breasts, lower back and buttocks,” says Dr Limba. 

Treatment: Tsholo says that there is no absolute treatment for stretchmarks, but that women can be comforted to know that they will fade into paler scars and sometimes become less noticeable, but will not go away completely. “The best advice would be to make sure that you keep the skin well nourished and a cream or oil made from plant oils rich in Omega 3,6, & 9 can be very useful. A study published in International Journal of Molecular Sciences by T.Lin et al showed that the topical application of some plant oils can have anti-inflammatory and skin barrier repair effects. This also means that the itching is reduced. So it is wise to seek information from your skincare therapist,” she adds. 

TOP TIPS

Sunscreen is imperative. 

When pregnant, all medication should be cleared by your physician / gynaecologist. 

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.